Monthly Archives: April 2011

Oh no! Nigeria!

I had to plan to write a post some days ago. I had the impression that the enthusiastic rhetoric about how successful the elections in Nigeria were set up resembled the comments on the eve of the Kenyan election in 2007. But I was too late.
I mean 57 percent (the share of votes for the incumbent Jonathan) sounds democratic and fair, but not very convincing…

Advertisements

Cartoon

Via Stuff Expat Aid Workers Like. Very nice. Created by Manu Cartoon.

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

Bureauwide

German bank involvement in Southern EU

It’s often annoying to have discussions about the current troubles within the Euro zone with those who are totally convinced that the whole euro thing is disadvantageous for Germany. There are typical assertions like: the Germans were too generous, Portuguese to lazy; the weaker countries need to adopt to the economic standards in the euro zone or otherwise drop out et cetera.

For all the annoyed people, the Economist provides an interesting contribution to the debate.

Bank involvement and contibution to bail-out

According to these data, Germany has an obvious interest in avoiding a Portuguese default. Barry Eichengreen argued that the public in Germany and other countries does not “want to hear that public money is required for bank recapitalization.” So it is a literally cheaper alternative is to provide to deal with the sovereign debt which sounds much better, much more generous, but with similar effects like a bank bailout.

Paper presented at CSAE in Oxford

A preliminary version of a paper that I am currently writing on behalf of the German Development Institute has been presented at the 25th conference of the Centre for the Study of African Economics.

There were various other interesting contribution. You can find links to all accepted paper here.

Rodrik's meeting with Gadaffi Jr.

Dani remembers:

The meeting, as it turned out, was a letdown. I was first briefed by a former Monitor Company employee, who gently intimated that I should not to expect too much. Saif himself held photocopies of pages from one of my books on which he had scribbled notes. He asked me several questions – about the role of international NGOs, as I recall – that seemed fairly distant from my areas of expertise. I don’t imagine he was much impressed by me; nor was I much taken by him. As the meeting ended, Saif invited me to Libya and I said – more out of politeness than anything else – that I would be happy to come.